Plan International

Consultant (Production of The Regional Flagship Report on Time to Act! Accelerating Efforts to End Child, Early and Forced Marriage in Asia Pacific and Research)

Plan International

Job Description

I. Introduction

Plan International is an independent development and humanitarian organization that advances children’s rights and equality for girls. We work alongside children, young people, our supporters and partners to tackle the root causes of the challenges facing girls and all vulnerable children. We support children’s rights from birth until adulthood and enable children and young people to prepare for and respond to crises and adversity. We drive changes in practice and policy at local, national, regional and global levels using our reach, experience and knowledge. For over 80 years we have been building meaningful partnerships for children, and we are active in over 75 countries. For more information, please visit https://plan-international.org/ II. Background

Globally around 21% of young women were married before their 18th birthday: 650 million girls and women alive today were married as children. 12 million girls under 18 are married each year. 25 million child marriages have been prevented in the last decade thanks to progress made. South Asia had the largest decline in the prevalence of child marriage during this time, from 49% to 30%. But progress must accelerate or more than 120 million additional girls will marry before their 18th birthday by 2030.1 Child, early and forced marriage (CEFM) is a harmful practice, form of gender-based violence and a violation of children’s rights and the rights of girls and women, as well as a fundamental impediment to human development. In some circumstances, it can also amount to genderbased violence. While boys are also affected by child marriage, it has particularly adverse effects on girls and young women, curtailing their education, social engagement and economic empowerment, violating their sexual and reproductive health and rights, limiting their autonomy and placing them at increased risk of violence. CEFM has serious life-threatening and long-term consequences for girls and women, as well as their communities and societies CEFM is a human rights violation. Despite laws against it, this harmful practice remains widespread. CEFM can lead to a lifetime of suffering. Girls who marry before they turn 18 are less likely to remain in school and more likely to experience domestic violence. Young teenage girls are more likely to die due to complications in pregnancy and childbirth than women in their 20s, and their children are more likely to be stillborn or die in the first month of life.3 Gender equality is one of the 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and includes a target on eliminating Child, Early and Forced marriage. Plan International Asia Pacific Regional Hub (hereinafter referred to as Plan International APAC) has identified elimination of CEFM as one of its strategic priority areas for influencing and programming. Over the past decade, Plan International across Asia have been investing concerted efforts in preventing, reducing and eradicating CEFM through comprehensive programmatic and influencing interventions and processes at different levels, resulting initially in Asia Child Marriage Initiative (ACMI, 2008). Further on, Plan International global 18+ framework on Ending Child, Early and Forced Marriage was developed in collaboration with Plan International APAC as a part of Plan International’s Because I Am a Girl campaign (2016). Holistic integrative programming focusing on elimination of CEFM gains a distinct character in Asia, evolving into a regional initiative Time to Act!, with a strong emphasis on influencing and youth-led advocacy and activism. This platform encompasses programming, influencing and research in ten countries from across the greater Asia Pacific Region (including South Asia, South-East Asia and Pacific), aiming to reduce the incidence of CEFM in targeted countries and ensuring CEFM is perceived, prohibited and eliminated as a harmful practice locally and nationally.

III. Plan International Asia Pacific Regional Hub’s evolving CEFM research agenda

Over the past decade, Plan International Asia Pacific Regional Hub (APAC) commissioned a number of important pieces of research on CEFM. The first research, completed in 2014 in partnership with The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), explored the perceptions of different stakeholders about the causes and consequences of CEFM and the efficacy of Plan International programming in addressing these factors in Bangladesh, India and Nepal. The second research study, completed in 2015 with Coram Children’s Legal Centre, gathered in-depth and detailed evidence on the root causes of CEFM practices in Bangladesh, Indonesia and Pakistan. In addition, the research informed the development of an index for measuring factors associated with the acceptability of CEFM (CEFM Acceptability Index), which is used by Plan International to inform programming, track progress and improve the effectiveness of Plan International CEFM interventions. A rich and diversified body of research exists on CEFM worldwide, yet important knowledge gaps remain. Prevalence and trends, causes, and consequences of CEFM and past efforts to prevent CEFM are identified as research priorities to explore further . An increasing number of countries with high prevalence rates of CEFM have begun to develop national initiatives to address it and there is a growing body of literature that has reviewed and revealed the successes and challenges experienced by these actors. However, little is known about the possibility and suitability of scaling up successful actions and programs . A recent Analysis of national systems to end CEFM noted that the sector still has much to learn about “how to plan, coordinate, implement and monitor efforts across different sectors; how to prioritise interventions which will maximise impact; and how to measure progress in the medium to long term”6 . It was identified as vital that these issues are well studied and analysed, so to inform and accelerate the multi-sectoral efforts to eliminate CEFM.

To that effect, two additional pieces of regional research had been commissioned and completed, focusing on consolidating and analysing the most up to date information on the issues relevant to gaps identified in the broader body of CEFM related research. In late 2017, Plan International APAC undertook extensive research on the prevalence of Child, Early and Forced Marriage (CEFM) in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste and Vietnam. The resulting technical report, titled Their Time is Now: Eliminating Child, Early and Forced Marriage in Asia provides comprehensive details on CEFM in Asia and further consolidates evidence that governments, universities, Civil Society Organizations, and Plan International have generated over the past ten to fifteen year. It analyses recent evidence on the prevalence, causes, trends, drivers and impact of CEFM and outlines actions that must be taken to tackle CEFM in Asia and the strong commitment needed from stakeholders at multiple levels. For more detail, please visit: https://plan-international.org/publications/their-time-now-eliminating-c...

The Time to Act! report (Plan International Asia Regional Hub, 2018) builds on the previous report Their Time is Now, and outlines actions that should be taken to prevent and eliminate CEFM in Asia. The Time to Act! report delves into emerging interventions by different international agencies and CSOs that have high potential to be successful and effective in preventing, reducing and eliminating CEFM, and highlights the factors that might lead to success. It also identifies initiatives and innovative approaches that seem most likely to eliminate CEFM if implemented at scale by governments and other relevant stakeholders in Asia and beyond. Extensive document review and interviews with a range of stakeholders were conducted in five focus countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia and Vietnam) to identify promising interventions and key success factors, challenges, opportunities and themes. For more detail, please visit: https://plan-international.org/time-act-accelerating-efforts-eliminatech...

As part of a multi-phased research series in the countries of South and South East Asia, youthled advocacy and activism among the interventions and innovative approaches with a high potential for impact if implemented at scale by governments and other stakeholders. A comparative analysis, building on previous CEFM research studies, was undertaken with a specific focus on different aspects of youth-led activism, advocacy and engagement to eliminate CEFM in Asia. The comparative analysis resulted in Their Time is Now – Time to Act! report (2019). This comparative analysis aims to systematize the information from 10 Asian countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Nepal, the Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste and Vietnam), where young people have been supported by Plan International in preventing, reducing and eliminating CEFM. It also provides an analytical overview of the key enablers and barriers encountered by youth advocates. This comparative analysis report presents key findings on structural and functional aspects of the youth groups engaged in CEFM elimination, while offering a set of practical recommendations for key stakeholders. It is complemented with a Thematic Brief, serving to strengthen and further legitimize youth engagement and activism in ending CEFM across Asia. For more details, please visit: www.civilsocietyasia.org/resources/their-time-is-now-time-to-act-report IV. The latest Research on use of digital platforms, tools and technologies to accelerate efforts to eliminate child, early and forced marriage in Asia and Pacific

The Internet has already transformed our lives at an unprecedented pace and scale. For children in Developed Countries, the digital world is the one they are born into and live within every single day. They are becoming the 5G and ultimately the 4th industrial revolution-ready generation, with Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, virtual reality (VR) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) changing the way we live and work. Many adults think about the Internet in a very instrumental way, as something they go to or use from time to time to accomplish specific things. Children don’t. For vast numbers, the Internet and its associated technologies are completely integrated into the way they live their lives across a very broad spectrum of activities. It is at once both part of and an extension of their lives: the most important way in which they communicate or engage with homework, friends, school, their favorite bands and sports clubs, even family members.

Online platforms, in particular social media and networking sites, are already an integral part of the lives of many children and young people across the world. While digital divides certainly exist, user numbers for the most popular platforms continue to grow as the internet becomes increasingly accessible globally.

While there is a substantive body of literature defining and identifying risks inherent to online communications and measures to prevent and counter abuse online, the benefits of technology remain less addressed and explored. Digital platforms, tools and technologies provide users with a range of benefits and opportunities that offline engagement is incapable of doing. The platforms allow for the creation of global networks with the ability to interact in real time. They enable Access to Information and the creation of communities without the requirement of physically being in the same space. They offer users opportunities to empower themselves with information, connections, and access to education, as well as means to exercise their freedom of expression and be active citizens. Safe online spaces can be a lifeline for oppressed and threatened minorities and can be indispensable in times of emergencies and disasters.

Leveraging online platforms in our work has a number of potential benefits, including: • Ability to quickly share information in multiple formats (text, images, audio, video) to geographically dispersed participants, as well as interact with, and receive information from them; * Reach more children and young people, particularly in locations where we do not have a physical presence; • Create communities and enable interaction between participants regardless of location, thus developing trust and strengthening engagement; • Create new participation opportunities for young people who are not interested in participating physically. For example, a young person may be shy to participate in face-to-face activities. Online participation makes the possibility to influence more accessible.

• Ability to gain new insights by analyzing data (e.g. discussions) on online platforms; • Cut costs and climate impact associated with face-to-face meetings.

• Young people can do volunteer work across countries, thereby getting to know new people and different cultures.

• Create an opportunity for young people to express their opinion without the influence of adults.These platforms provide opportunity for young people to be “in control” of their own voices.

Significantly, using online platforms in our work leverages technology that many young people already have and are familiar with, thereby helping make the most of the investment they have made. The CEFM focused programming and influencing across Asia Pacific region increasingly integrates utilization of a variety of digital platforms, tools, technologies and applications to strengthen different measures to prevent, report and reduce incidence of CEFM. A recently conducted Mapping of the CEFM focused online solutions (May 2020) provides initial overview of the actual and potential benefits of digital platforms, tools and technologies to accelerate efforts in eliminating CEFM. The use of the cyber tools identified through this mapping exercise spans from awareness raising to campaigning, from reporting CEFM related risks and newly identified CEFM cases to disseminating information on new laws and regulations on CEFM. However, while contributing to overall efforts to prevent and eliminate CEFM, these online solutions remain fragmented and underutilized.

The research builds on the initial mapping of different digital platforms, tools and technologies in use, while providing an analysis of online solutions specifically applied to CEFM prevention and elimination and with a high degree of replicability and scalability. The research also addresses gaps in the existing body of knowledge and provide recommendations on additional opportunities to harness benefits of the cyber space. The Research has the following objectives supported by specific activities: 1) Conducting a rapid literature review on use of digital platforms, tools and technologies in development work in general and to prevent, reduce and eliminate CEFM in particular addressed under this research ToR, to identify the existing body of research by other likeminded organizations engaged in eliminating CEFM and address any knowledge gaps observed; 2) Undertaking comprehensive mapping of the digital platforms, tools and technologies used by Plan International in Asia Pacific to contribute to preventing, reducing and eliminating CEFM and their specific purposes. From the literature review, indicate any similar initiatives by other key UN and INGOs engaged in CEFM response at different levels and in various contexts in the Asia Pacific region; 3) Based on the initial mapping, conduct a comparative analysis of the frequency of different digital platforms, tools and technologies use, their effectiveness and potential to contribute to online solutions preventing and eliminating CEFM; 4) Identifying and gaps in practice of using digital platforms and propose approaches to addressing them, while providing suggested way forward in increasing strategic use of digital platforms and strengthen their effectiveness; 5) Producing a synthesis report documenting the key outcomes and findings stemming from the mapping and analysis, while providing a set of action-oriented recommendations to inform next steps and increase effectiveness of the online solutions to prevent and eliminate CEFM.

V. Target audiences

There are different target audiences expected to benefit from this Research: a) Internally, it will further inform and strengthen Country Offices strategizing around the use of most effective digital platforms; b) Externally, it will inform the ongoing policy dialogue on measures to accelerate efforts to eliminate CEFM by 2030. Furthermore, it will provide entry points for increased collaboration with the IT companies and corporate sector; c) Young people belonging to different platforms and initiatives fostering activism to end CEFM will benefit from the information provided and use digital platforms in their activism more efficiently.

VI. Key purpose, objectives and deliverables

The main purpose of this consultancy is to produce a flagship report based on the narratives to be provided by Plan International APAC Regional Hub. The report will comprise two mutually interlinked parts: • Overview of Time to Act! regional initiative and platform to accelerate efforts in eliminating child, early and forced marriage in Asia Pacific; • Thematic report on use of digital platforms, tools and technologies to accelerate efforts to eliminate child, early and forced marriage.

Objectives:

• to identify high quality vendor for the report production; • to edit final text of the report; • to execute Design layout of the report and • to print a high-quality report.

The final expected deliverables include:

  1. An edited, proofread report layout, for the Plan International ARO approval;
  2. Final printed report in line with the defined parameters.
  3. The integral report, .pdf version
  4. Executive summary, .pdf version
  5. Key infographics, .pdf version
Key production parameters:

  1. The format of the report: A4
  2. Paper type: high quality paper in line with the production standards
  3. Estimated number of pages: 70 (subject to the final layout)
  4. Quantity: 300 copies
  5. Timeline: printed reports and .pdf versions to be delivered by 31 March 2021 (or earlier, if feasible)
  6. Photographs, media and branding guidelines will be provided by Plan International Asia Pacific Regional Hub Communications Team The project will be co-managed by Plan International Asia Pacific Regional Communications Team and Regional Head of Child Protection and Partnerships (focal point for content related communications).
VII. Contact details:

The report production is co-managed by Plan International Asia Pacific Regional Hub teams , based in Bangkok, Thailand and Hanoi, Vietnam respectively. Contacts: Quynh Tran Thu, Regional Lead for Communications and Campaigns (Quynh.TranThu@planinternational.org) Rasa Sekulovic, Regional Head of Child Protection and Partnerships (rasa.sekulovic@planinternational.org) The following deliverables are expected to be submitted by the selected service provider: VIII. Table of Deliverables

Deliverable /Format /Length/ Due

  1. An edited, proofread report layout, for the Plan International ARO approval / Word Maximum 70 pages / By 15 March 2021
  2. Final printed report in line with the defined parameters/ Printed Maximum 70 pages/ By 31 March 2021
  3. The integral report, /.pdf version .pdf Maximum 70 pages/ By 31 March 2021
  4. Executive summary,/ .pdf version .pdf Maximum 5 pages/ By 31 March 2021
  5. Key infographics,/ .pdf version .pdf Maximum 5 pages/ By 31 March 2021
Criteria for the selection of the vendor:

• Proven technical abilities, capacities and facilities to execute the tasks specified in this ToR; • At least 10 years of experience and successful track record in design, printing and related jobs; • Previous successful engagement with Plan International is an advantage.

Indicative budget: to be submitted by the interested candidates Contact details:

For administrative purposes and related procedures, please contact: Supornchai Nawataweeporn, CO & RO Senior Procurement Officer at Supornchai.Nawataweeporn@plan-international.org For media, branding and content related matters, please contact: Quynh Tran Thu, Regional Lead for Communications and Campaigns (Quynh.TranThu@planinternational.org) Rasa Sekulovic, Regional Head of Child Protection and Partnerships (rasa.sekulovic@planinternational.org) X. Evaluation criteria

Candidates will be evaluated against the following criteria: Criteria /Weight Proven technical abilities, capacities and facilities to execute the tasks specified in this ToR; 35% At least 10 years of experience and successful track record in design, printing and related jobs; 20% Previous successful engagement with Plan International is an advantage. 10% Financial proposal 35% Total 100%
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